Arthritis https://www.athritisexplained.com Arthritis Explained Fri, 03 Jul 2020 08:12:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.athritisexplained.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-arthritis-explained-book-cover-32x32.jpg Arthritis https://www.athritisexplained.com 32 32 Using Minocycline to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis https://www.athritisexplained.com/using-minocycline-to-treat-rheumatoid-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/using-minocycline-to-treat-rheumatoid-arthritis/#respond Mon, 15 Jun 2020 10:09:00 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=764 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the joints and cartilages, causing inflammation, swelling, and chronic pain. Minocycline is an anti-inflammatory antibiotic drug sometimes used to treat RA. Minocycline belongs in the tetracycline family of drugs, and it has been used for more than 3 decades to combat a […]

The post Using Minocycline to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the joints and cartilages, causing inflammation, swelling, and chronic pain.

Minocycline is an anti-inflammatory antibiotic drug sometimes used to treat RA. Minocycline belongs in the tetracycline family of drugs, and it has been used for more than 3 decades to combat a range of infections. Aside from its ant-inflammatory properties, it is also immune-modulating and neuroprotective.

Minocycline is usually taken by mouth at a dosage of 100 milligrams every 12 hours, or twice a day. It can be taken after eating, but it should not in any circumstance be taken with other medications such as antacids or iron supplement. It works slowly too, and it may take a few months for it take effect.

Furthermore, since minocycline is mainly used for treating infections and has been studied less, it is not commonly prescribed for RA itself. Not strictly approved by the FDA to treat RA, minocycline is instead prescribed “off-label.”

Why Is Minocycline Used for Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Though the exact causes of RA are not known, scientists have long suggested the involvement of bacteria in its development. As such, medications that treat bacterial infections, such as minocycline, are considered helpful in treating RA’s symptoms.

Minocycline is more effective if used in the early stages of RA as it helps relieve its less severe symptoms. It can help ease joint swelling and tenderness as well as other markers of inflammation. It doesn’t completely stop the progression of the disease, but it does slow it down by slowing down the immune system and reducing inflammation.

How it does so is less clear. Indeed, the exact mechanism of how minocycline works with respect to managing RA symptoms is not fully understood. The only thing completely sure of is minocycline’s anti-inflammatory properties. Minocycline has been known to affect nitric oxide synthase, improve interleukin-10, and suppress B and T cell function of the immune system.

Side Effects of Minocycline

As an antibiotic, minocycline is generally well-tolerated. However, there are possible side effects as well, the most common of which are gastrointestinal problems, dizziness, and skin rash. Long-time users of this medication are also likely to notice changes in their skin color, which usually go back to normal after stopping the medication.

Use of minocycline may also lead to increased sensitivity to sunlight, leading to frequent sunburns and skin rashes developing after exposure to the sun. To combat this, avoiding spending prolonged time in the sun is recommended. The use of sunscreen is also highly suggested.

Minocycline can be passed into breast milk, so breastfeeding mothers should avoid doing so in order to prevent delayed development of teeth and bones in their babies. Minocycline can also increase chances of fungal infections and dizziness in a nursing infant. Minocycline is not recommended for those under 8 years old as it can cause issues in teeth and bone growth.

Taking minocycline can also lead to nausea and changes in appetite.  Side effects of taking minocycline are largely mild.

Common Medications for Rheumatoid Arthritis

The discovery of far more effective medications has led to minocycline becoming nearly antiquated when it comes to treating RA. Instead of minocycline, physicians instead prescribe mainly the following four treatment options:

  • DMARDs
  • Biologics
  • Tofacitinib
  • Glucocorticoids

Depending on how long the person has had RA and how severe the symptoms are, the type of medications prescribed can be added or switched up.

DMARDs

Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are a group of drugs that form the foundation of treating RA. The most common DMARD is methotrexate, which suppresses the immune system to stop the inflammation. Methotrexate is most often taken alone, especially if the person has had RA for less than 6 months.

Biologics

Biologics, a type of genetically engineered group of drugs, are especially designed to target part so the immune system that triggers inflammation. Biologics can either be tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor or non-TNF.

Biologics under the TNF inhibitor class are the following:

  • adalimumab (such as Humira)
  • etanercept (such as Enbrel)
  • infliximab (such as Remicade)
  • certolizumab pegol (such as Cimzia)
  • golimumab (such as Simponi)

Biologics under the non-TNF inhibitor class are the following:

  • abatacept (such as Orencia)
  • rituximab (such as Rituxan)
  • tocilizumab (such as Actemra)

In Summary

Minocycline, though somewhat effective in relieving inflammation, is not a standard treatment option for RA. There are far more effective options available instead, such as DMARDs. DMARDs, biologics, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids offer better benefits and viability compared to minocycline.

Ask your physician about available treatment options that may be better for you. If minocycline isn’t part of it, you may inquire as to why to gain a better understanding of how it works or why it might not be the best for your case. Becoming more involved and curious about decision-making with respect to your health can only be beneficial in the long run.

The post Using Minocycline to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/using-minocycline-to-treat-rheumatoid-arthritis/feed/ 0
What Are the Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-are-the-treatments-for-rheumatoid-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-are-the-treatments-for-rheumatoid-arthritis/#respond Sun, 24 May 2020 13:05:00 +0000 https://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=814 What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Inflammations of the joints occur in patients at the onset and the development of arthritis. Inflammation is a process the body goes under wherein the body’s white blood cells along with its immune protein assist in giving us protection from foreign elements such as; viruses and bacteria. This […]

The post What Are the Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Inflammations of the joints occur in patients at the onset and the development of arthritis. Inflammation is a process the body goes under wherein the body’s white blood cells along with its immune protein assist in giving us protection from foreign elements such as; viruses and bacteria. This is how our bodies help in shielding us from infections.

What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? However, in some diseases; the immune system of a person, or its defense system; sets off an inflammatory signal even when foreign substances are absent. Conditions as these are called autoimmune diseases. This is when the immune system creates havoc over its own tissues responding as if healthy tissues were in a state of infection.

Misdirected inflammation is the outcome of some types of arthritis like Psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and systemic lupus erythematosus. What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Before we do that, let’s first take a look at the symptoms of arthritis.

Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Also known as rheumatoid disease is one sort of inflammatory arthritis that is accompanied by chronic joint swelling. It typically manifests on the joints of an arthritic patients hands, knees, feet, and hands. Rheumatoid arthritis affects the entire system impacting the body’s organs. Patients who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis experiences a myriad of physical symptoms such as swelling, redness, tenderness, warmth; and stiffness of the patient’s joints causing severe pain. The motion and movability of the joints are compromised making the patient compensate on their movements by limping. More than one joint is usually involved. If left unchecked and untreated joints will begin to show deformity and the proper function; and task of the joint/s diminishes. Rheumatoid arthritis is also accompanied by fatigue, fever, and anemia.

How to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis?

What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Some people are prone to developing arthritis more than others; and this can depend on a few things like family history, lifestyle and previous injury. Arthritis can change the way the person lives because of the pain that comes along with the condition. Early detection and proper diagnosis are ways to improve and manage the occurrence and gravity of arthritis. It is important for a person with the disease to understand the importance of switching up the way they eat work and live in order to gain a better handle on the condition.

There are a number of avenues a doctor and patient can take in order to manage the pain of living with arthritis. However it is important that both physician; and patient are rigid in following certain arthritis treatment options in order for the suffering patient to feel the positive benefits of treatment.

Medications

What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Over-the-counter painkillers can help manage the pain brought about by ice right this for short periods of time especially during flare ups. Some of the more common Pain relievers are ibuprofen, acetaminophen and Naproxen. These are good choices for short-term relief from arthritis pain however you should always consult with your doctor about the amount of pain relievers that you take; and how often you should take them. Should you be taking them for a long period of time it may be necessary to talk about joint replacement surgery. You may also discuss Cortisone shots that could be helpful for short term flare ups.

Gout medications are recommended when it is tolerated by the individual however like most other medications in the market that is given to patients these drugs have potential side effects. Side effects may include allergic rash symptoms; such as diarrhea and nausea as well as abnormal blood counts and muscle weakness. Some medications can exacerbate and worsen the kidney stones while others can cause irritation of the stomach lining and develop ulcers in some patients.

Medications for RA

Check out these specific medications for your Rheumatoid Arthritis below:

Arthritis Therapy

Stretching is a good way to keep a person, suffering from arthritis, flexible. Now only does it why flexible it also improves the patient’s range of motion; and the way you can move your joints. This also is beneficial because it helps the patient decreased the odds of injuries and pain caused by arthritis.

Make sure that you always start your exercises and workouts with a five minute warm-up walk. After this you may lie on your back; and stretch your hamstrings by looping a bitch around your phone using the sheet to help pull the leg straight up in the air. Hold this for at least 20 seconds then lower the leg you should take this twice on both legs.

You may want to consider the traditional Chinese medicine of acupuncture; which involves insertion of find needles to certain target points on the body which can help alleviate pain and manage it.

Exercise

Make it a point to shed pounds if you are overweight or obese. The extra weight that we carry puts a lot of pressure on the joints; and on the protective cartilage that acts as padding between the joints. Losing weight will help take away the stress from your hips and knees. Every pound lost removes 4 pounds of pressure that is put on the knees that affects the patient.

Losing weight lessons the wear and tear in the joint and may actually slow the progress of arthritis. For every 10 pounds that is lost relief is felt because it will reduce the pain by at least 20%. Exercising is important in order to slow down the deterioration that is happening within the body; and causing the pain of arthritis. The pain it still may make the individual hesitant to exercise and workout. But research has shown and proven that the stiffness; and pain caused by arthritis only gets worse when a person is inactive.

Exercising regularly will get the heart pumping and will increase the blood flow in the body. Increased blood flow allows the cartilage to stay well – nourished and function properly. And as an extra benefit exercising helps the individual attain a healthy weight; in order to keep in shape and manage the pain of arthritis. Staying as active as possible is very important make sure that your activity is something that is suited for you; and approved by your doctor.  Avoid high impact activities such as running and jumping. It is best to choose exercises that are low impact like brisk walking cycling and swimming.

Other Treatment Options for Rheumatoid Arthritis

If you have been taking anti-inflammatory medications and pain relievers for an extended period of time it may be wise to talk to your doctor about joint replacement surgery. The problem with prolonged use of anti-inflammatory drugs is that these medications can take a toll on your liver.

If you still experience a lot of pain and difficulty getting out of bed in the morning or if your knee remains swollen; and has started to bow, the symptoms may indicate that you may possibly need knee replacement surgery. Although the most typically replaced joint in the body is the need this does not mean that your orthopedic surgeon will make this decision for you on the whim.

Replacement Surgery

Knee replacement surgery is not taken lightly and the process begins with the doctor determining the medical history of the patient making sure to know they have the information about your general health and the specifics of the pain you experience on the me; and most especially how arthritis affects your quality of life.

Your doctor will recommend tests in order to find out the alignment of your leg the stability, strength and motion of your knees. An X-ray will give the surgeon a better inside of whether the bone is deformed or damaged. And accompanying MRI gives the surgeon a more detailed look into the soft tissues surrounding your knee; and a deeper look into the bone and cartilage itself. Blood tests and laboratory exams are possible procedures that a patient of arthritis will have to undergo in order to rule out or identify other reasons; and causes for the pain experienced in the knees.

Should the physician decide to proceed with the total knee replacement he will be given detailed information about the possible problems and risks that entail the surgery. You will also be given information on what to expect after surgery; and what you need to do in order to maintain the knee replacement. The first order of business that the doctor will discuss with the patient would be to lose any extra poundage that the patient may be carrying to alleviate some of the stress that is being experienced by the knees.

Change Your Lifestyle

What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Aside from giving advice to lose weight doctors will also investigate what sort of food a patient with rightists usually has. Diet plays a big factor in the development of arthritis in persons between the ages of 30 to 50 years old. Therefore indulging in foods that promote arthritis will need to be avoided in order to see the positive results of the treatment. Since gout is commonly linked with obesity, significant weight loss can improve the management of the condition dramatically. Reducing calorie intake is a good way to shed pounds.

Diet Change

Doctors would usually recommend a diet that is low in saturated fat. They would normally recommend the replacement of refined carbohydrates like white bread potatoes and sugar with complex carbohydrates like whole grains and vegetables which help reduce the serum uric acid.

The doctor will strongly advise the patient to avoid frequent consumption of red meat and seafood. Avoidance of liquor and beer consumption will also be strongly recommended by the physician since alcoholic beverages increase the risk of gout. Aside from alcoholic beverages increasing the risk of a gallon sweetened beverages that is high in fructose corn syrup also heightens the possibility of the development of gout. And because that is a chronic condition if left untreated the patient may experience repeated painful and immobilizing acute flare ups of gout.

Complications of doubt may develop if it is not treated and eventual joint damage will be a parent and leave the patient immobilized with their quality of life compromised. Some of the risk factors of gout is hereditary and genetic and these make a predisposition for gout and preventable. However other risk factors can be curbed, like obesity diet and lifestyle.

Physical Therapy

With the help of a physical therapist you can work on targeting the weak spots that has been bothersome and painful and importantly can improve not only the balance but also the strength and joint alignment of the patient. Since arthritis has no known cure yet constant research is being done in order to provide more detailed guidance on how to treat people with arthritis.  And arthritis patient has to take the responsibility of understanding their condition in order to avoid events that may cause further damage to their joints and most especially the cartilage.  

What are the treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Making it a point to build a strong understanding of how arthritis affects the body and the options available in terms of treatment and therapy is the best strategy for coping and managing arthritis. Learn more about the disease including things that you need to avoid doing so as not to worsen the condition.

Conclusion

Knowing the symptoms of arthritis can greatly help in arresting whatever damage is being caused to the cardiologist and bones of the individual. Recognizing the signs and indications that point to arthritis can power an individual to get help from a doctor to get proper diagnosis in order to find the best possible treatment for the sort of arthritis they suffer from. Apart from going to a doctor getting all the possible tests and getting the proper diagnosis it is the responsibility of the individual suffering from arthritis to understand the disease so that they are better able systems live a lifestyle that makes it possible for them to carry out your daily tasks and routine.

For more info about alternative treatments and therapies you can do to manage your Rheumatoid Arthritis, check out the video below:

The post What Are the Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-are-the-treatments-for-rheumatoid-arthritis/feed/ 0
Can Alcohol Affect Arthritis https://www.athritisexplained.com/can-alcohol-affect-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/can-alcohol-affect-arthritis/#respond Mon, 27 Apr 2020 10:06:00 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=762 Can alcohol affect arthritis? There is no doubt that alcohol is a huge part of adult life for a lot of people. Can alcohol affect arthritis? Whether you partake in the beverage or not, there is a high chance that you will end up encountering it one way or another in your daily life: it […]

The post Can Alcohol Affect Arthritis appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
Can alcohol affect arthritis? There is no doubt that alcohol is a huge part of adult life for a lot of people. Can alcohol affect arthritis? Whether you partake in the beverage or not, there is a high chance that you will end up encountering it one way or another in your daily life: it could be through large advertisements you see on the freeway while driving, or even as simple and mundane as memes shared on social media. In this article, you’ll learn about can alcohol affect arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Alcohol

Can alcohol affect arthritis? Alcohol isn’t the only staple of adulthood; with age comes a host of illnesses and health conditions as well. One of these is rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is an autoimmune disease that causes the joints to be inflamed, leading to chronic pains. As time goes on, the inflammation grows more severe, causing the cartilage to deteriorate further and may then result to permanent damage. More than 1.5 Americans are suffering from RA.

If you have RA and are an alcohol drinker, then the question whether there’s a correlation between the two might have popped in your mind. The answer is, it’s a bit of both. Can alcohol affect arthritis? There are some studies that claim that consuming alcohol in moderation may be safe for people with RA. Indeed, alcohol has anti-inflammatory effects that may even be helpful in preventing the development of the disease.

However, the important thing to remember here is the word “moderation.” Excessive alcohol consumption is detrimental to the health, after all, and it can cause severe implications, more so if you’re taking medications for RA as it can interact negatively with the drugs.

Triggers

Before drinking alcohol, no matter the amount, it’s best to consult first with your doctor about how much exactly you can drink without adverse effects. This is especially important if you have been prescribed meds for managing your RA. Can alcohol affect arthritis? There are some medications that don’t mix well with alcoholic beverages and may thus trigger or even exacerbate RA symptoms.

For instance, drinking alcohol if you are taking ibuprofen or naproxen is not recommended as it may lead to developing stomach ulcers and bleeding. Meanwhile, if you are taking acetaminophen, methotrexate, or leflunomide and still continue to partake in alcoholic beverages, the risks of developing liver diseases grow higher.

Alcohol, Arthritis & Weight Management

Another thing to consider when drinking alcohol if you have RA is your weight. One of the ways to manage symptoms of RA and decrease inflammation is to watch your weight, as this helps lessen pressure exerted on your joints and tissues. Can alcohol affect arthritis? Alcohol, especially beer, is considered a source of empty calories which can lead to weight gain. Cutting back on alcohol is one of the recommendations for losing weight. Additionally, the taste of alcohol tricks our brain into craving more savory or salty foods, which are also huge contributors to gaining weight.

Alcohol, Arthritis & Quality of Sleep

When managing arthritis, or any other health conditions for that matter, ensuring that the body gets enough rest is important. Sleeping is when the body takes a breather and heals itself, allowing the cells and tissues to regenerate. As such, getting enough sleep is paramount to improving one’s health.

The amount of sleep you get is as crucial as the quality of sleep. After all, even if you manage to sleep for more than 8 hours, if it’s marred by restlessness, then you would still be waking up feeling exhausted. Alcohol, though it helps you fall asleep quicker, can result to a deteriorated sleep quality. It causes imbalances in the chemicals your body produces, throwing off your rhythm. Also, consuming alcohol can lead to needing frequent bathroom trips as your body tries to flush out the substance before more of it gets absorbed into the bloodstream. As such, you would likely be waking up often in the middle of the night to relieve yourself.

Getting It Right: How Much Alcohol Is Okay?

Can alcohol affect arthritis? According to the CDC, moderate alcohol consumption amounts to up to 1 drink per day for females and up to 2 drinks per day for males. Of course, this still depends on the medication they are taking.

A glass of red wine as a nightcap could be enough to curb your craving for alcohol. It is one of the healthier varieties of alcohol, after all. However, it is still better for you to consult your physician first if you want to continue partaking in alcoholic beverages even after developing RA. If you do choose to drink, make sure to watch yourself and don’t fall into the trap of drinking excessively (characterized as around 4 drinks at a time for females and around 5 drinks at a time for males).

In Summary

Can alcohol affect arthritis? Alcohol can be healthy in moderation, but excessive intake could have adverse health effects, especially for people with conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. It’s best to check with the doctor first to ask whether it’s safe for one to drink alcohol while with RA. Be informed about how much alcohol exactly can be consumed safely to not interfere with prescription meds.

The post Can Alcohol Affect Arthritis appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/can-alcohol-affect-arthritis/feed/ 0
Can People Die from Rheumatoid Arthritis? https://www.athritisexplained.com/can-people-die-from-rheumatoid-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/can-people-die-from-rheumatoid-arthritis/#respond Thu, 19 Mar 2020 10:02:00 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=760 Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes pain and swelling in various parts of the body, specifically the joints. A chronic condition with no one precise cause, RA has no known cure. Though RA itself is not fatal, it can lead to numerous complications that lead to […]

The post Can People Die from Rheumatoid Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes pain and swelling in various parts of the body, specifically the joints. A chronic condition with no one precise cause, RA has no known cure. Though RA itself is not fatal, it can lead to numerous complications that lead to a shortened lifespan. Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? Indeed, according to research, people with RA are twice as likely to succumb to cardiovascular disease and respiratory problems, thus potentially shortening the life expectancy by 10 to 15 years. In this article, you’ll learn about can people die from rheumatoid arthritis?

Outlook for Patients Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis

Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? Being diagnosed with RA doesn’t automatically increase one’s likelihood of dying due to the disease. It still depends on various factors such as age, lifestyle, and diet.

Additionally, though there is no cure for the disease itself, the symptoms of RA can be effectively managed. Through a variety of treatment options as well as DMARDs (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs), the life of a person with RA can be successfully prolonged, the disease’s progression slowed, and the pain and distress relieved. Treatment plans have better chances of working well if they are taken early in the progression of the disease.

Life Expectancy with Rheumatoid Arthritis

Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? Fatality of RA is most often a result of the complications that arise from inflammation caused by RA. Due to this inflammation, the person is likely to develop other medical conditions.

A person with RA has a weakened immune system as well, leading to quicker development of complications as well as fast contraction of infections. Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? As the disease progresses, the symptoms also worsen.

Aside from the weakened immune system, the chronic inflammation caused by RA has serious health consequences too; the inflammation can cause damage to otherwise healthy cells, tissues, and organs, which can lead to life-threatening complications if left unchecked.

Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? Furthermore, having RA earlier in life would mean that you would have to live with it longer than someone who developed it later on. The longer you live with the disease, the higher the risks are of you developing other complications that lead to a shortened lifespan.

Life Expectancy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in Men and Women

Women are likelier to develop RA than men, with their chances almost thrice over that of men’s. Additionally, symptoms of RA in women tend to be more severe. The progression of the disease in women are also likely to progress aggressively, which means there are higher risks of developing life-threatening complications.

On the other hand, men with or without RA are likelier to develop cardiovascular diseases, which can manifest much worse should they be diagnosed with RA as well.

Complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Permanent joint damage can result from the progression of RA, but it is not the only complication to watch out for.

Heart Disease

RA can inflame and damage the arteries and the muscles of the heart. There is also a risk of buildup of plaque in the arteries, leading to atherosclerosis, which can then result to higher chances of heart attack and stroke. Indeed, according to the Arthritis Foundation, RA is associated with almost twice the risk of having ischemic stroke and thrice the risk of deep vein thrombosis, or blood clotting in the veins of the legs. There is also four times higher risk of having a grave and critical pulmonary embolism.

Respiratory Disease

Aside from cardiovascular conditions, people with RA are also likely to develop respiratory diseases. This includes developing nodules in the lungs. There is also the risk of accumulation of fluid in the lung tissue, as well as developing blockages in the small airways of the lungs.

Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? What’s more, there is the possibility of having bronchiectasis and interstitial lung disease, which affects 1 in 10 people diagnosed with RA. Interstitial lung disease makes breathing difficult or nigh near impossible, as it results from the excessive inflammation in the lung tissue, caused by an overactive immune system attacking the body itself. The inflammation leads to scarring in the lung tissue, and in severe cases, a lung transplant may be required.

Infections and Other Complications

Due to a weakened immune system, people with RA are more susceptible to developing severe infections and other diseases. Flu, cough, and colds are some of the diseases that can be easily contracted with a weakened immune system. 

Aside from these, there is also risk of developing eye inflammation, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid vasculitis, which is inflammation in the blood vessels.

In Summary

Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease, has no known cure. Though it by itself is not fatal, it can lead to potentially life-threatening health complications. Predicting the outlook for RA can be a bit difficult as it relies on a variety of factors such as age and how long the person has been living with RA.

To help manage the disease, working directly with a physician is recommended. Lifestyle changes are also suggested, such as stopping smoking and eating a well-balanced diet.

The post Can People Die from Rheumatoid Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/can-people-die-from-rheumatoid-arthritis/feed/ 0
Stem Cell Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis https://www.athritisexplained.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-rheumatoid-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-rheumatoid-arthritis/#respond Tue, 25 Feb 2020 09:52:00 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=758 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system is triggered to attack tissues, joints, and cartilage. More than 1.5 million in the United States suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. A person with RA can experience extreme pain, inflammation, swelling, and stiffness. As RA progresses, its symptoms can worsen. The disease can […]

The post Stem Cell Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system is triggered to attack tissues, joints, and cartilage. More than 1.5 million in the United States suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. A person with RA can experience extreme pain, inflammation, swelling, and stiffness.

As RA progresses, its symptoms can worsen. The disease can affect not only the joints but the cartilages as well, which may result to permanent damage and loss of function. Additionally, complications may arise as the inflammation spreads to the tissues of the heart, lungs, kidneys, skin, and eyes.

There is currently no known cure for RA, though its symptoms can be effectively managed by a variety of treatment options. Currently, studies are being done to look at other alternatives, one of which is stem cell therapy.

What Is Stem Cell Therapy?

The human body has over 200 different types of cell, each having definite characteristics that allow them to perform clearly defined roles. Cells with the same roles group together to create tissues, which then form organs. For instance, muscle tissues cluster together to create the heart.

Stem cell therapy is a procedure in which a person’s dead and diseased cells within the body can be replaced with healthy ones. A stem cell is a type of cell with no specific function; instead, it possesses the unique ability to adapt and develop into various types of cell as the situation requires.

The Process

The stem cells are sourced from body tissue, which can come from either an embryo or an adult human. The stem cells are isolated in the laboratory and are then controlled and regulated to develop into specific cell types. Once done, these cells are injected into the person’s tissue or blood stream.

There had been debates over the ethical and moral considerations in stem cell therapy, as these stem cells were harvested from a separate specimen. However, advances in technology and medicine are rendering these debates null. Indeed, the cells for this procedure can now be replicated within the person’s own body. Since their own cells are involved, the risks could be considerably lessened, as opposed to when cells from another person is used.

How Stem Cell Therapy Can Help with Rheumatoid Arthritis

In RA, the immune system attacks the lining of the joint capsule. This leads to the inflammation of the joints, leading to chronic pain and swelling. As the disease progresses, the cartilage, which is the connective tissue between joints, deteriorate as well.

With stem cell therapy, the cells in the cartilage and bones are replaced using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are injected into the tissues surrounding the affected joints. Aside from replacing the diseased cells, this could potentially reduce the inflammation caused by the immune system.

Where operation logistics are concerned, MSCs lessen the worry for Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching. MSCs derived from umbilical cords are not recognized by the immune system as a foreign body, and thus cell rejection won’t be a problem. 

Is Stem Cell Therapy an Effective Treatment Option for Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Stem cell therapy is a promising alternative treatment for RA. However, since it is still in its trial stage and research studies are still limited, it is far from being standard practice for RA treatment. More analysis will have to be done to investigate its effectiveness both in the short-term and long-term recovery of the patient.

Risks and Side Effects of Stem Cell Therapy

Because of the limited resources and studies done on the subject with respect to using it as a viable treatment option for RA, stem cell therapy can cause some medical complications.

Some of these complications may include:

Infections

Injecting cells into the body, and using harvested cells in the first place, makes the specimen susceptible to contamination especially when not handled properly enough. Viruses and bacteria may interact with the specimen, and thus enter the body without resistance. These harmful microbes may cause an infection to develop or may even worsen an existing infection.

Worsening of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Though stem cell therapy may be done to treat RA, there is still the risk of it aggravating the symptoms of the disease instead. Not enough studies have been done to fully conclude the scope of its effects on the treatment of RA.

In Summary

Most research on stem cell therapy is still on the inception or clinical trial stage. They offer promising insights on the effectivity of stem cell therapy as a treatment for RA in the future, but right now, it is far from being a sustainable standard procedure. Further work would have to be done by scientists to advance this idea.

Additionally, studies on the cause behind the immune system attacking its own cells, tissues, and organs are also being done to get to the root of autoimmune diseases like RA. This question, should it be answered, would be instrumental in understanding autoimmune diseases and in developing far more effective treatment options than those at hand right now.

The post Stem Cell Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-rheumatoid-arthritis/feed/ 0
Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hair Loss: What is the link? https://www.athritisexplained.com/rheumatoid-arthritis-and-hair-loss-what-is-the-link/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/rheumatoid-arthritis-and-hair-loss-what-is-the-link/#respond Mon, 27 Jan 2020 09:44:00 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=751 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks the body itself, particularly the joints. This results to inflammation which then leads to chronic pain and swelling. Though RA targets the joints, however, it can give rise to complications that affect the rest of the body. As the disease progresses, […]

The post Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hair Loss: What is the link? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks the body itself, particularly the joints. This results to inflammation which then leads to chronic pain and swelling. Though RA targets the joints, however, it can give rise to complications that affect the rest of the body. As the disease progresses, the likelihood to develop other medical conditions, such as cardiovascular and respiratory problems, also increases. In this article, you’ll learn about the link between RA and hair loss.

Chronic Disease

It has no known cure, though there are various treatment options available to manage its symptoms, decrease inflammation, and minimize the pain felt.

RA is a chronic disease that can damage multiple body systems and organs. A person with RA has a higher chance of developing conditions like osteoporosis, lung disease, and anemia. The weakened immune system also leads to quicker contraction of infections. A person with RA can be more susceptible to eye and skin problems as well.

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hair Loss

In RA, as an autoimmune disease, the immune system mistakenly attacks its own cells, tissues, and organs. This may include attacking the skin tissues, where hair follicles are located. Thus, though rare, RA can indeed cause hair loss in some people.

On the bright side, hair loss in RA, should it indeed manifest, is typically not severe. Rather than the hair falling off completely, it simply thins in some places. RA may not even be the actual cause of hair loss but rather the medications taken to manage it instead.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Medications and Hair Loss

Various medications are prescribed to manage the symptoms of RA. The most common are disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). DMARDs suppress the immune system in order to reduce chronic inflammation and control the symptoms of RA.

There are various types of DMARDs, the most common of which is methotrexate. Methotrexate suppresses the immune system through aiming at fast-growing cells, preventing them from growing to avoid inflammation. Unfortunately, these fast-growing cells include hair follicles. Furthermore, methotrexate reduces the level of B vitamin folate in the body; this vitamin is important in keeping the hair healthy. As such, taking methotrexate can have hair loss as a side effect. Indeed, methotrexate is responsible for the hair loss of 1 to 3 percent of people with RA.

Other Medications

Other medications, such as leflunomide, can also contribute to hair loss. Leflunomide is most often taken in tandem with methotrexate, and it works the same way too, leading to hair loss in about 10% of its users.

Hair Follicles

Biologics, a genetically engineered group of drugs created from living cells, can also trigger some instances. Biologics are designed to specifically target parts of the immune system that causes the inflammation. Though it isn’t exactly known how biologics, such as etanercept and adalimumab, can cause hair loss, there are some who suggest that it is in part due to how biologics may upset the balance of the proteins—specifically the messenger cytokines—in the body. This may then cause an interruption in how the body communicates hair follicle regeneration to the brain.

Fortunately, hair loss due to medications isn’t permanent.

In the event that a person has inherited male or female pattern baldness, RA medications may trigger or accelerate hair loss. This type of hair loss is more permanent.

Coping with Hair Loss

For most, the hair is a crowning glory. This is especially for true for women, who are likelier to develop RA than men. It’s a good thing that hair loss is relatively easy to manage.

Some of the tips you can follow to minimize this symptom are:

  • Avoid aggressively scrubbing your scalp when you wash your hair.
  • Avoid using a hairdryer. Allow your locks to dry naturally. The intense heat from the dryer can cause your hair to be brittle, resulting to more hair fall.
  • Stir clear of styling products as much as possible. Gel and mousse may damage your hair, especially when used excessively.
  • Don’t pull or tug your hair when combing through it or removing tangles.

You may also take supplements to promote healthy hair. Folic acid and biotin are helpful in protecting against hair loss.

In Summary

RA by itself doesn’t typically cause hair loss. Instead, falling hair is a result of the medications used to manage and treat RA symptoms, in which the medications target cells like the hair follicles.

There are steps you can take to curb hair loss caused by RA medications, such as taking supplements that promote hair growth. Stressing the hair and scalp through vigorous combing and tugging is also something to avoid.

If you are living with RA and are concerned with the rate in which your hair is falling, talk to your rheumatologist immediately. Changes in your medication may be suggested. It also good to check whether this is a symptom of another underlying medical condition.

The post Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hair Loss: What is the link? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/rheumatoid-arthritis-and-hair-loss-what-is-the-link/feed/ 0
Is There a Natural Remedy for Arthritis? https://www.athritisexplained.com/is-there-a-natural-remedy-for-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/is-there-a-natural-remedy-for-arthritis/#respond Mon, 14 Oct 2019 23:49:11 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=614 Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? A lot of patients are often asking if minerals, vitamins and other nutritional supplements can help ease stiffness and pain that’s related to arthritis. The simple answer is that these things can definitely help with the right diet and exercise. Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? The […]

The post Is There a Natural Remedy for Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? A lot of patients are often asking if minerals, vitamins and other nutritional supplements can help ease stiffness and pain that’s related to arthritis. The simple answer is that these things can definitely help with the right diet and exercise. Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? The diet that people take can also play a role in various chronic conditions. For instance, if you are diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, you need to watch your diet because it could make your condition worse if you don’t. In addition to that, following a proper diet can also lower the risk of complications.  In this article, you’ll learn is there a natural remedy for arthritis?

Is There a Natural Remedy for Arthritis: Vitamin D

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? Everyone needs vitamin D. This is also known as the “Sunshine Vitamin” because it’s main source is the sun. Getting enough Vitamin D can certainly help your body to absorb calcium. It can also help your bones stay strong and grow properly which is why it can be one of the best solutions for preventing arthritis. 

A patient diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis should get enough vitamin D. However, some medications for rheumatoid arthritis can also increase your risk of vitamin D deficiencies so you need to be careful about that because it can lead to complications. 

Why Do People with Arthritis Need Vitamin D

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? According to some researchers, people who often take steroids orally usually have a higher risk of vitamin D deficiency. If you happen to take corticosteroids for rheumatoid arthritis, you might be twice as likely to be short on Vitamin D compared to an average person. 

If you don’t get enough Vitamin D, your bones can become brittle and soft. If this happens, then you are at a higher risk of deformities, fractures and other bone – related problems. 

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? For people with rheumatoid arthritis, vitamin D can also have additional benefits. It primarily plays a role in the body’s immune system which is good because rheumatoid arthritis is a type of autoimmune disorder. Rheumatoid arthritis also causes high levels of inflammation, and the best part is that Vitamin D can help mediate this problem. If you are diagnosed with arthritis, you may need your Vitamin D levels to be checked regularly. You should also ensure that you take the right steps in order to correct any nutritional deficiencies you may have.  

Walking On Sunshine

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? The best way for you to get vitamin D is just by walking under the sun! You just need around 10 to 15 minutes of being exposed in the sunlight every other day. Enough UV radiation can definitely help your body produce vitamin D. However, make sure that you don’t expose yourself too much because it might cause skin cancer.

Eat Foods Rich in Vit. D

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? Another source of Vitamin D is through eating the foods that’s rich in it. Did you know that fishes like salmon, mackerel and other types of fish are rich in Vitamin D? You can also get it from beef liver, cheese and egg yolks though only in small amounts. There are also a few foods that naturally contain this vitamin. Some are just fortified with it like cheese, cereals and milk. If you can’t get enough vitamin D by adjusting your diet or from sunlight, you may need to take a supplement. Make sure to consult your doctor before taking any medication.

Is There a Natural Remedy for Arthritis: Apple Cider Vinegar

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? One of the best natural remedy for rheumatoid arthritis is apple cider vinegar. This is known for its anti – inflammatory benefits. Apple cider vinegar is often used for cooking but it’s also been associated with various advantages such as weight loss, lower cholesterol levels and blood sugar as well as a remedy for stomach aches.

The anti – inflammation abilities of apple cider vinegar can also help in lessening the pain caused by arthritis. This is because it naturally contains antioxidants and vitamins that can help speed up the healing of inflamed joints caused by rheumatoid arthritis.

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? The most common way of using this natural remedy as a treatment is through drinking it. However, this is highly acidic. Before you drink it, make sure that you dilute it with water so that it will also prevent damage to your teeth. 

More Ways

Another way on how you can use apple cider vinegar is by applying topically for local pain relief. You just need to pour some on a cotton ball, and apply it to the affected area at least twice a day. In order to prevent irration, make sure to also dilute it with either an olive oil or coconut oil so that you can massage it into the affected area. If you happen to have adverse reaction or skin irritation, then stop it immediately. It’s best to consult your doctor before applying or drinking anything even if it’s a natural remedy.

Is there a natural remedy for arthritis? There are a lot of people that adds apple cider vinegar in their bath before they go to bed as it helps ease the pain caused by arthritis. You can try adding 1 cup to your evening bath, and just sit on it for at least half an hour. This may help reduce the swelling and pain overnight. 

The post Is There a Natural Remedy for Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/is-there-a-natural-remedy-for-arthritis/feed/ 0
Is Walking Good for Arthritis? https://www.athritisexplained.com/is-walking-good-for-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/is-walking-good-for-arthritis/#respond Mon, 30 Sep 2019 23:44:25 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=611 Is walking good for arthritis? According to physicians and researchers, exercise can indeed help in easing stiffness and pain caused by arthritis. Is walking good for arthritis? The most important thing you have to remember before you do any type of exercise program, you have to first understand your body’s limitations as well as the […]

The post Is Walking Good for Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
Is walking good for arthritis? According to physicians and researchers, exercise can indeed help in easing stiffness and pain caused by arthritis. Is walking good for arthritis? The most important thing you have to remember before you do any type of exercise program, you have to first understand your body’s limitations as well as the level of exercise that will give you the best results. In this article, you’ll learn the answer to your question, is walking good for arthritis?

Is Walking Good for Arthritis: Why Exercise?

Is walking good for arthritis? Exercise is very important especially for people suffering from arthritis. This will help increase flexibility, combat fatigue, reduce joint pains, and also increase strength. Obviously if painful joins and stiffness are already giving you so much stress, the thought of exercising or walking can be overwhelming.

Is walking good for arthritis? Here’s the thing though, keep in mind that you can do baby steps with this. You don’t need to swim fast or even run a marathon for you to reduce the pain or symptoms brought by arthritis. You can do simple exercises that will enable you to not just maintain a healthy weight but also eventually ease the pain. The secret is this: exercising and walking is key to overcome the threat of arthritis immobilizing you.

Why Exercise is Important

Is walking good for arthritis? Exercise such as walking can ultimately improve your fitness and health. You can do simple things without hurting your joints. An arthritis treatment program can give you benefits that can help you maintain bone strength, give you energy throughout the day, strengthen muscles around your joints and also provide you with a good night sleep. It can also lead to enhancing the quality of your life and improving your overall balance.

Is walking good for arthritis? What a lot of people worry about is that exercise will aggravate the pain and stiffness in the joints. This is false. In fact, lack of exercise can make your joints even more stiff and painful.

This is because the muscles and surrounding tissues are very important to maintaining support for your bones. If you don’t exercise or walk around, it will weaken the supporting muscles thus creating more stress on your joints.

Exercises for Arthritis

Is walking good for arthritis? Your physical therapist will most likely recommend different types of exercises that includes the following:

  • Strengthening Exercises
  • Range – of – Motion Exercises
  • Aerobic Exercises

Range – Of – Motion Exercises

Is walking good for arthritis? The exercises involve in this group can help relieve joint/ muscle stiffness which will increase your ability to move your joints through using a full range of motion. The exercises involve may include movements like rolling your shoulders forward/ backward, raising your arms and the likes. The best part about this is that you can easily do it on a daily basis.

Strengthening Exercises

These exercises can help you build strong muscles which will then protect and support your joints. Weight training is an example of this because it won’t only help you maintain your weight but also strengthen your muscle. Keep in mind that you need to avoid exercising many times in a row. You have to set aside a rest day between your workouts. If you think your joints are swelling or painful, make sure to take a day or two to rest.

Whenever you’re starting strength – training exercise, this is typically done thrice a week as it will help improve your condition. However, twice a week is already good enough as well.

Aerobic Exercise

Is walking good for arthritis? Endurance exercises such as aerobic can ultimately help your overall fitness. It doesn’t only help you with your arthritis condition but also improve your cardiovascular health, increase stamina and also help you control weight.

Some examples of low – impact aerobic exercises that can be easy on your joints include cycling, walking, swimming or using a treadmill/ elliptical machine. You can work your way up to around 150 minutes of moderate aero workout per week. You can also split that into 10 – minute blocks if that will make it easy for your joints.

Moderate aerobic exercise is the most effective and safest way for patients diagnosed with arthritis. It can be done twice or thrice a week but it surely is better than no exercise at all. In order to determine if you’re properly doing it or you’re improving, you should be able to carry a conversation during the exercise though the rate of your breathing might increase a bit.

The post Is Walking Good for Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/is-walking-good-for-arthritis/feed/ 0
What Does an Arthritis Flare Feel Like? https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-does-an-arthritis-flare-feel-like/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-does-an-arthritis-flare-feel-like/#respond Mon, 09 Sep 2019 23:40:44 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=609 What does an arthritis flare feel like? There are various ways on how to deal with flares/ flare – ups caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). You can try using home or natural remedies along with lifestyle/ diet changes. What does an arthritis flare feel like? Flares are periods of increased disease activity whenever a person […]

The post What Does an Arthritis Flare Feel Like? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
What does an arthritis flare feel like? There are various ways on how to deal with flares/ flare – ups caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). You can try using home or natural remedies along with lifestyle/ diet changes. What does an arthritis flare feel like? Flares are periods of increased disease activity whenever a person is experiencing the different symptoms of arthritis. Typical symptoms include joint swelling, joint pain and severe stiffness. In this article, you’ll learn what does an arthritis flare feel like?

What Does an Arthritis Flare Feel Like: How to Reduce RA Flares

What does an arthritis flare feel like? Patients diagnosed with RA usually find that flares come and go in waves throughout their lifetime. The duration of these flares varies from a couple of days to a couple of months. The severity and symptoms usually vary between individuals, or sometime it is a case – to – case basis.

Dealing with RA Flares

What does an arthritis flare feel like? At the time of this writing, there’s no medication that can completely cure rheumatoid arthritis. There’s also no solution to prevent one from experiencing flares. The aim of treating arthritis in general is only up to the extent of minimizing inflammation, reducing symptoms, and also for preventing damaging of joints.

Here are some home remedies and techniques you can do to relieve the pain of RA flare and reduce general symptoms:

Managing Flares at Home

The best way to minimize the pain is to become aware of the early symptoms of flare – ups. Here’s how:

Keep a symptoms journal

What does an arthritis flare feel like? By keeping a journal, you can be reminded of certain triggers that may happen when you experience a flare – up. If you know what, when and how things triggers the flares, you can manage it and also completely avoid it.

Rest More

Once a flare begins, patients will most likely be required to reduce the level of their activities. When flares are severe, it’s highly advised that you take a lot of rest. If you need to work, you may need to find a work – at – home job, or let somebody else manage your business for you. You need to also have a reliable support system from family and friends.

Exercise Gently

Doing stretches and gentle motion exercises can help prevent the symptom of stiffness whenever a flare – up happens.

Use Hot or Cold Packs

What does an arthritis flare feel like? You can use hot/ cold packs if you want to reduce the pain of swelling. As soon as symptoms appear, most patients use them until the flare – up is gone. Keep in mind though that you shouldn’t directly apply the cold or hot substance on your skin. Make sure to wrap the pack in a towel before applying it in the swelling area.

Improve Your Diet

What does an arthritis flare feel like? Some doctors advise their patients to follow an anti – inflammatory diet as this can help prevent flares and also reduce the painful symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. People who want to follow an anti – inflammatory diet should avoid eating foods that are processes or made with artificial ingredients and also refined sugars. It’s best to eat a Mediterranean diet because it’s rich in whole foods.

You can incorporate the following in your diet (please make sure to consult your physician first before adding this to your new diet):

  • Omega – 3 fatty acids: Walnuts, Tuna, Flaxseed, Salmon and Chia Seeds
  • Foods rich in Antioxidants: Fruits, Cacao, Veggies, Cinnamon and Beans
  • Nuts and Seeds
  • Extra – Virgin Olive Oil
  • Apple Cider Vinegar

Try a Dietary Supplement

What does an arthritis flare feel like? There are certain herbal supplements that patients can try as it can help relieve flare – up symptoms. This include Curcumin which is a chemical found in turmeric, fish oil, ginger, gamma linolenic acid (GLA), calcium, copper, folate, magnesium, chromium, iron, sodium, selenium, zinc, Vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K.

Reduce Stress

Reducing stress is important for preventing flare – ups, reducing overall symptoms, or shortening the length of the pain. Patients can also try different methods in order to reduce stress whenever a flare comes on. This may include meditation, deep breathing, journaling, yoga, tai chi, guided imagery, positive thinking, guided practice etc.

Medications

It’s possible to divide the meds that your physician prescribes to you into 3 groups:

Meds that treat symptoms:

This includes non – steroidal anti – inflammatory drugs, steroids, and acetaminophen. These medications can help relieve acute pain and also reduce inflammation.

Immunosuppressant drugs: 

These treatments should slow the progression of rheumatoid arthritis and can also prevent joint damage through halting the body’s response against inflammation. Immunosuppressant drugs are also known as Disease – Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs).

Biologic Response Modifiers

What does an arthritis flare feel like? The drugs that belong to this group are sort of the latest version of DMARDs and it also mimics human immune molecules. Biologic response modifiers can do an inflammatory response in a more targeted way.

The post What Does an Arthritis Flare Feel Like? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-does-an-arthritis-flare-feel-like/feed/ 0
What is the Best Treatment for Arthritis? https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-is-the-best-treatment-for-arthritis/ https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-is-the-best-treatment-for-arthritis/#respond Mon, 19 Aug 2019 23:23:47 +0000 http://www.athritisexplained.com/?p=603 What is the best treatment for arthritis? Before your physician determines what kind of treatment will be best for you, he/ she will have you undergo a physical exam. Your doctor will check if there’s any swelling on your joints, or if it’s warm or there’s a sign of redness. What is the best treatment […]

The post What is the Best Treatment for Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
What is the best treatment for arthritis? Before your physician determines what kind of treatment will be best for you, he/ she will have you undergo a physical exam. Your doctor will check if there’s any swelling on your joints, or if it’s warm or there’s a sign of redness. What is the best treatment for arthritis? You can also expect your doctor to see how well you can move your joints. Once he/she suspects that you have the symptoms of arthritis, you will undergo various laboratory tests to confirm diagnosis. In this article, you’ll learn what is the best treatment for arthritis? 

What is the Best Treatment for Arthritis: How to Diagnose

Laboratory Tests

What is the best treatment for arthritis? Lab testing involves analyzing different types of body fluids. This process can help pinpoint the specific type of arthritis you may have. Blood, joint fluid or urine are the most common types that are being analyze in a lab setting. In order to acquire a sample of a joint fluid, the physician or medical professional will numb and cleanse the area before he/ she inserts a needle in between joints in order to draw some fluid for testing.

What is the best treatment for arthritis? Imaging testing can surely help in pinpointing the problems in your joint that could be causing the symptoms. Below are some common examples of image testings:

X- Rays

X – rays that uses low levels of radiation can help not just visualize the bone but also show if there’s any cartilage loss, bone spurs and bone damage. Even if it may not reveal the symptoms of arthritic damage early on, it can still help track if there is any progression in the disease. 

Computerized Tomography (CT)

CT scanners are just like X – rays but the main difference is that it’s more in – depth because doctors can view the bone in different angles. It can also be use to combine the information that came from the cross – sectional views of the internal structures. It can help to view not just the bones but also the surrounding soft tissues.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging combines radio waves using a magnetic field. The magnetic field is so strong that it can produce more – detailed cross – sectional images. They can see tendons, ligaments, cartilages and other soft tissues surrounding the swollen area.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound uses high – frequency sound waves in order to see soft tissues, bursae and cartilages. Bursae are structure near the joint that contains fluid. Ultrasound is sometimes used as a guide when it comes to placing the needles for injections and joint aspirations.

What is the Best Treatment for Arthritis: Treatment

What is the best treatment for arthritis? Treating arthritis usually focuses on improving joint function and also relieving symptoms. You may need to try various treatments, or sometimes a combination of treatments before you determine what works for you.

Medications

The meds used to treat arthritis varies. It will depend on the type of the diagnosis. The most commonly used medications to treat arthritis include:

Painkillers

This medication has no effect on inflammation but it’s very helpful in reducing pain. Painkiller includes Tylenol which can be bought over – the – counter options.

For patients experiencing severe pain, doctors may prescribe the following painkillers:

  • Opioids
  • Tramadol
  • Hydrocodone

Opioids usually target the central nervous system in order to relieve pain. It is often used for long – term dependence but the side – effect is that it could cause physical or mental dependence and therefore can be addictive.

Non – Steroidal Anti – Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

Non – steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reduce both inflammation and pain. NSAIDs usually include over – the – counter drugs such as Ibuprofen and Naproxen. Some types of these drugs can’t be purchased without proper prescription by the doctor.

There are also oral NSAIDs but it may cause stomach irritation for some patients. It could also increase your risk of stroke or even heart attack. Most patients purchase NSAIDs that come in gels or creams that can be rubbed in joints.

Counterirritants

There are different kinds of ointments or creams that contain menthol which is an ingredient that usually makes hot peppers spicy. If you rub these ointments on the skin over the aching joint, it can interfere with the pain signal transmission from the aching joints.

Biologic Response Modifiers

This is often used along with DMARDs. Biologic response modifiers are drugs that are genetically engineered. This usually targets different protein molecules that are involved in the immune response.

Corticosteroids

This class of drug help reduces inflammation and also suppresses one’s immune system. It can be injected directly on the aching joint or also taken orally.  

What is the Best Treatment for Arthritis: Therapy

What is the best treatment for arthritis? Physical therapy can work for some patients though it would still depend on the kind of arthritis they have. Exercise can also help strengthen the muscles that surround the joints and also improve the range of motion. However, in some cases, braces or splints may be needed.

Surgery

Your physician may suggest that you undergo surgery if in case conservative measures don’t work. This can include the following:

Joint Repair

In some cases, joint surfaces can be realigned to improve function or reduce the pain. This procedure can be performed by doing small incision on the affected joint.

Joint Replacement

This procedure can remove your damaged joint and replace it with an artificial one. This is mostly done to replace knees and hips.

Joint Fusion

This type of surgery is used for smaller joints like fingers, ankles, and wrists. It involves the removal of the ends of 2 bones in a joint and locking the ends together until it gets healed into a single unit. We hope this article answer your question, what is the best treatment for arthritis? Stay tuned for more of our blog posts!

The post What is the Best Treatment for Arthritis? appeared first on Arthritis.

]]>
https://www.athritisexplained.com/what-is-the-best-treatment-for-arthritis/feed/ 0